“Spin” by Robert Charles Wilson

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Sci-Fi lovers set phasers to awesome, you’re in for a treat!

What’s it about?

This novel centers around intertwining lives of three people who together witness an event that will dictated the path of not only the rest of their lives, but the fate of everyone on earth. The astronomical changes of that day in October set course for a time-altering event that means the sun will be extinguished in the next forty years. This October Event wasnt naturally occurring phenomena, so what set it in motion and why? How do you go about living in a dying world and how do you plan for a future that might not exist?

Worth reading because:

Often sci-fi fans have to forego reading good language for the sake of an interesting story, but not so with Spin, the language is liquid and the characters are full-bodied. This is one of the most satisfying books I have read in a really long time. It’s easy to forget that it is Science Fiction and I think this is a book any lover of character, story and language could enjoy. I was particularly impressed when the author referenced something I do in my working life and got the simile correct …it was a managed replica of sunlight passing through the screen from a source ninety million miles away, like a ray-trace program rendered on a colossal scale. Which is something other authors have failed to do in the past. I am just so glad someone with this much talent for language chose to write in this genre!

Any other books by this author worth reading?

After reading this book I couldn’t believe I had never heard of this author before, he’s a Hugo award winner (for Spin in 2006) and the story was sublime, I must have been living under a rock! Although Spin is the first of a trilogy, I have decided not to read the other two. I do however want to read everything else by this author.

Choice Cuts:

There are so many kinds of time. The time by which we measure our lives. Months and years. Or the big time, the time that raises mountains and makes stars. Or all the things that happen between one heartbeat and the next. It’s hard to live in all those kinds of time. Easy to forget that you live in all of them.

Daylight flowed through the room like water, like a luminous river in which I was suspended, drowned in empty minutes.

…silhouetted like skeletal skyscrapers, lost soon after in billows of vaporized ocean water. Twelve pillars of white fire, separated by miles but compressed by perspective, clawed into a sky turned indigo blue by their combined light.

Delicious.

Did you enjoy Spin?  What Robert Charles Wilson book should I read next?

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“The Rosie Project” by Graeme Simsion

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What’s it about?

Don Tillman is a Professor of Genetics living in Melbourne, he finds most social situations awkward and has never been on a second date. Pushing 40, he knows that statistically there should be someone out there for him and so he embarks on “The Wife Project”, a lengthy and comprehensive questionnaire aimed at finding the perfect match. Much amusement ensues and the naivety in which Don views the world makes for a very charming and quirky adventure.

Worth reading because:

It is a genuinely heart-warming and funny book. I can’t believe it took me so long to get around to reading it. Don is one of the most offbeat and original characters I have ever read and you will not be able to put this book down. It’s silly, light, fun and a wonderful means of escapism.

Any other books by this author worth reading?

Graeme Simsion has since written a sequel to this book called The Rosie Effect, it has good reviews but I am in two minds about reading it, I don’t want to spoil the gem that is the original, but it would be the perfect book to devour for my next long haul flight. Have you read the sequel? If so, let me know what you thought of it.

Choice Cuts:

Fault! Asperger’s isn’t a fault. It’s a variant. It’s potentially a major advantage. Asperger’s syndrome is associated with organization, focus, innovative thinking, and rational detachment.

I could not see the speedometer, and was not accustomed to travelling in an open vehicle, but I estimated that we were consistently exceeding the speed limit. Discordant sound, wind, risk of death—I tried to assume the mental state that I used at the dentist.

So, to add to a momentous day, I corrected a misconception that my family had held for at least fifteen years and came out to them as straight.

Delicious.

Did you enjoy The Rosie Project as much as I did?